The Top 5 Horror Movies on Netflix

1. Alive (2020)

This Korean zombie film became a surprise hit on Netflix at the height of the pandemic, but the truth is that it could have worked even without the “timeliness” of the storey of a man trapped in his apartment during the apocalypse. This is an excellent modern zombie film that alternates building tension with clever action scenes. It is smart and fast-paced and one of the best horror movies on Netflix .

2. Cargo (2018)

Cargo represents the apex of the horror genre’s emo zombie wave. It stars Martin Freeman as a man who has recently lost his wife to infection and is on the verge of becoming rabid. He only has 48 hours before becoming one of the walking dead roaming the Australian landscape, and he needs to find a suitable safe haven for his baby daughter during that time. It’s well-acted and adds some new twists to the traditional zombie mythology.

3. Fear Street (2021)

Leigh Janiak co-wrote and directed a trilogy of adaptations loosely based on R.L. Stine’s books. These classic horror films tell the storey of Shadyside, a small town cursed by witches generations ago, resulting in waves of murders ever since. They appear at first to be mere homages to classic horror (and there are plenty of fun references for genre fans), but they also stand firmly on their own two feet.

Also Read 5 Horror Movies: That You can Watch on Prime Video.

4. The Forest of Love (2019)

It’s impossible, to sum up, Sion Sono’s work in a single sentence. He’s one of our craziest filmmakers, and this is one of his craziest films. There is no plot description that can adequately describe what one will find in this alternately gory and darkly humorous experience. Sono has a truly unique voice, and this is one of his most memorable efforts.

5. Girl on the Third Floor (2019)

Travis Stevens co-wrote and directed this gruesome, clever 2019 horror film about a man, played by wrestler C.M. Punk, who renovates an old house in Chicago’s suburbs and discovers, well, bad things. It’s a film that recalls great horror films from the 1970s and 1980s in ways that we don’t see from the genre very often nowadays, with great practical effects and a pitch-black sense of humour. It’s abrasive and crunchy. Don’t pass it up.

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